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How Do You test a 3D Printer, Anyway?

How Do You test a 3D Printer, Anyway?

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42 Comments

  1. blandiant

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    Hi,
    for your test (all of them) how do you know if its a problem of the printer and not a problem of settings in the slicer ? (because each filament is different : they need different printing temperature, different extrusion ratio/multiplier, retraction pourcentage, etc…)
    for example: the support material test, it's the slicer who say at which distant of the object to place the support (0.2/ 0.1 etc) to avoid a bond between the support and the object; So how are you sure that its a problem of the printer and not a problem of the slicer ?
    Thank you

  2. Jim Foster

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    Hi,

    I would like to try your tests on my 3D printer, but when you run yours for judging, what layer height are you using, and if applicable, what infill percentage. I assume you don't use generated supports and build plate adhesion options in the slicer. I'm basing this question off of the Cura 3 "Recommended" settings.

    Thanks

  3. Zack Beeblebrox

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    Wow, that first system really sucks.

  4. Everytek EVK

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    Great job guys

  5. Alfred Bowles

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    When testing for dimensional accuracy you mentioned that any difference less than 0.1 mm will be considered a high quality print. However when you measure your test sample, it read 20.25 mm and you still said that this is a high quality print.
    Is this a mistake or am I getting something wrong?

  6. Jamie Bainbridge

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    This was great. Blind and thorough. Gives us DIY printer builders a good yardstick to measure our own machines against too.

  7. Robert Zarfas

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    What I want to know is if my printer does poorly on a rest what do I do about it? What can I adjust or tighten? What settings do I change in my slicer? Are some types of failures more prone to certain slicers or certain geometries?

  8. Carl Beck

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    Very interesting. However I could not find your results for 3D Printers.

  9. JAT.MN

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    Thanks for the detailed explanations.
    Keep up the great work!

  10. Jeremy Taylor

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    All of the tests should be conducted in the same filament. There can be significant performance difference because of different formulations or color additives.

  11. Esme Osgood

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    I just got a printer so this will be interesting.

  12. Finley

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    What's the name of the printer at 00:42

  13. Rheller82

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    Will there be a video on what you can do to improve poor test results?

  14. supersmashsam

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    Maybe I'd suggest adding some kind of structure to the big square test to make it more rigid.
    You could even make it so you have multiple square inside one another so you can have multiple mesuring points.

  15. MoxMix

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    Sound is horrific. No explanation what to do to get proper results. Useless.

  16. Lewis Commons

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    Please test the LulzBot TAZ 6. Thanks!

  17. Jeffrey7282000

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    the music was to loud for me

  18. Blasterforge

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    do a tangential lighting test on the vertical surface

  19. Benjamin Schroeder

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    Hi,

    These are some good calibration tests, useful for tuning a particular printer. However, a lot of variables need to be controlled for direct comparison between printers to be valid. Can you talk a little more about what was done to keep the testing fair (beyond the numbering system that was mentioned)?

    E.g.

    How much initial calibration / tuning does each printer get? During shipping, belts / eccentric nuts / etc. can loosen and it seems a bit unfair to judge a printer poorly because of that.

    What environmental considerations are made? Ambient temperature / drafts / etc. can affect print quality quite a bit.

    Is anything done to reduce effects due to different filaments? e.g. does each roll of filament get used on all tested printers? I'm certain that the examples shown were just for illustrative purposes, but there were a couple of "this print [which is orange] is not good, but this print [which is blue] is good", which just made me wonder if the blue plastic is providing an advantage.

    Other factors, such as orientation of overhangs and printing speed can greatly affect print quality. How was this handled in the testing?

    Thank you

  20. tbird81

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    This was actually a clever special effects demonstration by using the same person (just trimmed the beard a bit). See if you can spot the transitions when they're passing things to each other. It's a bit easier with the still camera, but I imagine required a lot of manual matting.

  21. Frank Müller

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    Hated the music, stopped watching

  22. Frank Müller

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    Most of us hate the music

  23. Ron Floyd

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    I apologize if you've already covered this subject. I'm completely new to 3D printing. 40 years of CNC operating and programming though. I just discovered your channel. My first printer ever should be here in a couple of weeks. At 72 yet – so wish me luck – LOL
    If you have videos, or good links for this question, please post them. Most processes have a preferable order – just like machining, or installing drivers on computers do. Do you have an optimized order for fine tuning a printer – or, for filaments after the printer has been tuned.
    I assume bed leveling first, once the printer is stabilized mechanically – belts, tight screws, etc. Such as extruder temp, bed temp, acceleration/deceleration, jerk, accuracy, retraction, etc. I assume also, that there is a preferable order starting from the adjustments with the most effect, and ending with the ones with the least. There are lots of tuning part downloads available (like your evaluation ones), but I haven't seen much about what order is the best – if any. I realize that the filament is an ever-changing variable, but most newbies like me will probably start with a somewhat low-end PLA – in order to keep the learning process costs down to a minimum. If you don't have info to recommend, it might make for a good video, like this one has been.
    Thanks!

  24. R. Rob

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    ,I know there has been a lot of effort to make this video, so thanks for that!
    interesting video BUT !!!
    I miss the information HOW you solve the problems?

    thanks again and …
    Best regards from the Netherlands
    Rob.

  25. hammershigh

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    stupid background music, bye

  26. Unmannedair

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    A) results?
    B) what about layer bond strength and temperature tolerances? Material strength?

    Also, a lot of what you guys talked about was user skill based. A skilled user can get a good print out of a bad printer. Your test would be more accurate if only one person printed all the prints.

  27. Phillip Dobbs

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    I like that you guys reply, good job.

  28. Neil Katin

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    I think you linked to the wrong thingiverse page: you linked to the 2015 version. The 2016/17 version is https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2071696

  29. SeanHodgins

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    Wow, super thorough. Awesome! Ill be printing some of these to test as I upgrade my super inexpensive printer.

  30. Highteckhobbies

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    can you test clone printers like the Qidi Tech vs name brand ???

  31. Norm Caissie

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    And how does that setup stop you from giving the printer crappy settings for printers you want to give a bad score? ringing and banding is a speed issue.

  32. Thoran666

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    Oh god! Total bliss after 1:40 when that noise ended

  33. Stefan Batrinache

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    That guy's forehead is brighter than my future

  34. farvision

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    So why don't we have full color plastic printers yet? Getting better at monochrome only!

  35. MDSsystems

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    MAKE your a bit late with this video even my grandma has a 3d printing calibration video

  36. GeoDroidJohn

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    Few questions, 1. Who prepares each printer? The owner or a rep from each company?
    2. Is only one slicing profile allowed for all the prints or can a new profile be made foflr each print?
    3. What were the minimum requirements for each profile, ie can I print at 20 mm/sec to make sure it prints good or was like 50mm/sec a standard. Also, what layer height was required?
    4. How many attempts was each printer allowed?
    5. What are you comparing the test pieces to? Commercial FFF?

    Thanks for all the great test prints!

  37. GeoDroidJohn

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    I have several printers, can I use these models to test all my machines for my channel?

  38. Matt's Gaming n Vlogs

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    Hi

  39. Nikhil Rao

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    hey, dude on the right… try to calm yourself, you look to tense on the cam.. 😀

  40. Hugo Madureira

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    Well done folks! Thank's for share! I'm wondering, what test has more fails of all?

  41. Erin cooper

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    The classic music is back!! Nostalgia!!!

  42. Nikodem Bartnik

    September 1, 2018 at 8:43 am

    Great video, now I will be able to better test my 3D printers

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